Showing posts with label Catfish. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Catfish. Show all posts

2018-05-02

Understanding The Secrets Behind CATFISH

Catfish - Photo: Pixabay
There is actually a reason behind catfish being one of the best game fish for many experienced as well as beginner fishermen. One part of the story is that this fish is really smart and fast unlike many people think. Catching this type of fish requires you to know some catfish facts first. Understanding its biology as well as behavior is the key to becoming a better catfisher. If you know how this fish moves, feeds and breeds, then you got a good chance of catching it easily. Following some useful catfishing tips would also increase your chances of catching the big cats that you've always dreamed about.

Catfish got their name obviously from the barbells around their mouths, which look like cat whiskers. These barbells are there for a really good reason. Because of their high sensitivity, the catfish are able to taste the surrounding water for possible food as well as for potential danger. This morphology makes it a highly adaptive fish even in the worst water conditions.

Unlike many people think, a lot of catfish species have various venoms to defend themselves against other predators. While the existence of venomous species that can cause harm to men hasn't been reported in North America, many proofs show that there are highly poisonous catfishes in some parts of the world. When this fish feels threatened, it extends its spines or (barbs) and strikes with them when attacked (even by a human). The good thing is that most of the catfish venoms aren't strong enough and can only cause you some pain that could last an hour or so. The best practice that you could do is to always wear safety gloves when unhooking them.

Another catfish fact that you should be aware of, is that these fish don't actually have scales, yes they don't have any! It's true that armored catfishes have bonny plates covering some parts of their bodies, but they don't really have scales. Someone would wonder how this fish is able to survive harsh conditions even without having solid scales that back them up. Well, the secret as many experienced catfishers say is in their tough skins. So if you think that their lack of scale is making them weak, you need to think again.


Catfish doesn't actually ask for the luxury many other species do. They eat whatever food they find in their face. They can eat everything from meat, plants, bugs, fish eggs and even dead species. The best time for catching a catfish is probably when they are out for food. While these game fishes can eat anything, they definitely don't eat men as many myths and false stories try to tell you!



2018-03-28

TIGER SHOVELNOSE CATFISH - Pseudoplatystoma Fasciatum

TIGER SHOVELNOSE CATFISH - Pseudoplatystoma Fasciatum



2018-03-25

A BRISTLENOSE PLECO Profile

Ancistrus sp.
Photo  by mrpotet 
The Bristlenose Pleco is one of the most popular aquarium fish around the world today but there is some confusion about certain aspects of its naming and exactly what is being referred to when certain names are used. Therefore if you feel you'd like to get to the bottom of how it all fits together and how best to look after these extraordinary fish them please read on.

Bristlenose Pleco is the common name given to the genus Ancistrus which is made up of over 140 species of catfish which come from rivers and streams in South America. Interestingly the name Bristlenose Pleco is not the only common name that they are known as. In Australia, they are predominantly known as Bristlenose Catfish but in other parts of the world including Canada, the USA, and the UK they are known as Bristlenose Plecos or simply Plecos or Plecs.

Therefore if you are new to the world of Bristlenose then be careful as the name Pleco can also be applied to many other genera of Catfish outside the genus Ancistrus, as well. So what you may find in some instances is, when Pleco is used, it may not necessarily be in reference to Bristlenose.
The next important point to understand is that the most common species within the genus is A. cirrhosis or simply the Common Bristlenose. The Common Bristlenose is normally identified by it's a brown color with lighter colored spots but it's also important to know that there is also an albino color variation as well. Both of these color variations also come in what is known as shortfin and longfin varieties, so all up there are 4 different variations of the Common Bristlenose.

A. cirrhosus was also once known as A. dolichopterus. As a consequence when you see the name A dolichopterus it may be incorrectly referring to A. cirrhosus or it could be referring to the real A. dolichopterus which is also known as the Starlight Bristlenose or simply L183. Therefore look for clarification when you do see this name.

This then leads into what is known as the L Number System. Many members of the Catfish family, Loricariidae of which Ancistrus species are a member are allocated what is called an L Number. This is applied to species that have not yet been scientifically classified as a means of identifying them. You may also find that some species have more than one L Number due to being named in different locations which can also lead to some confusion.

Therefore you will find that most Bristlenose Plecos are referred to by their species name or their common name or an L Number or even a combination of any of these.

So as you can see the naming of the Bristlenose Pleco can be a little confusing but luckily for the enthusiast their ease of care is much simpler. Simply ensure the water is heated to between 20 to 27 deg C, it is fairly well oxygenated, there is some sort of current and the pH is slightly acidic. These conditions replicate those of much other fish as well and as such the Bristlenose is well suited to be kept with many different types of freshwater fish.

This is of course just one of the reasons why they are so often called upon as the number one choice for an algae eater in so many community tanks. Therefore you would think that feeding would be pretty straightforward as well and in many respects it is.


Firstly, don't assume that they will survive on just foraging for algae. They do like some added vegetables as well. Blanched zucchini, carrots, and broccoli are all favorites. Also, add the occasional algae wafer and meat-based food and they will be extremely happy. The most important factor though is that plant-based foods should make up the majority of their diet as too much protein can lead to constipation and bloat, which can be fatal.

So now hopefully you'll understand what is being referred to when the many different terminologies are used to describe the Bristle-nose Pleco. They are fairly easy to care for as well but just make sure you get the essentials right and your Bristlenose Pleco will live a long, happy and healthy life.

    The Bristlenose Pleco is just such a useful and likable freshwater aquarium fish. They are easy to look after and breed but just like the most thing it does pay to do some quality research if want to keep and breed the Bristlenose Pleco successfully. Find out more at my Bristlenose Pleco blog.
    Article Source: EzineArticles


2018-02-23

Callichthyidae Fish Care and Aquariums - ARMORED CATFISH - Corydoras

Vaginamouth
Photo  by Furryscaly 
Catfish Armored with Barbels

Coming from Trinidad and South America are the Mail and Armored Catfish. These catfish are well respected even by larger fish. The catfish have partly covered bony plates, which double and its back and head has a covering. The mail and armor catfish have fatty moveable fins, which the adipose surround a hefty backbone. The dorsal fins are near the backbone. These catfish have two sets of barbel at the base of its mouth.

Another group of catfish includes the Genus Corydoras. 

This group of fish is relatives to the Callichthyidae. If you are searching for tank catfish, hit the shop and buy a couple of these good buddies. The hardy fish have a curious nature, as well as amusing features. These catfish are ideal as well since they will clean up the neighborhood without a problem, thus eliminating pollutant build up.

If you are purchasing the mail or armored catfish for breeding, you will need a tank solely for housing these fish.

How to dress the tank
Armor and mail catfish tend to enjoy housing in murky colored waters where fine gravel rests at the bottom of the aquarium. Cryptocoryne is ideal to provide a hiding place for these fish, yet you should keep plant volume to a minimal. Stones are nice hiding spots for the mail and armored catfish, yet you must arrange them as arches, or related formations.

How do I decide on water temperature?
Catfish are not friendly to overheated waters. Therefore, the water temperature should be around 72 degrees Fahrenheit. You should also avoid over illuminating the tank. The water should have moderate alkalinity, hardness, or neutral conditions. As the fish mature, you will need another aquarium to manage conditions and segregated arrangements. During spawning, you should fill another tank up to fifteen gallons of water. You will know when spawning time has arrived at the shifting colors. Look for light rosy tints.

How do they mate?
The fish will naturally mate in pairs. Sometimes however when the fish are placed in separate tanks, spawning will not occur. If this happens, you want to reduce the water temperature to around 62 degrees Fahrenheit. In addition, you will need to add clean water to the tank. The fish will lay eggs the size of 2 mm and up to 400 eggs. After the eggs are hatched, you want to add methylene blue to the tank, so that the fry can prepare peacefully for deliverance. Fry fish from mail or armored fish tend to rot, so the water should be tainted a bluish shade, which is the purpose of methylene. Once the fry comes to the world, you want to feed them Micro worms, and later feed the fish saltwater shrimp.



Bronze Corydoras, otherwise known as Corydoras Aeneus come from Venezuela and Trinidad waters. The fish grow 2 ½ inches in size. This particular breed is not a favorite fish added to the tank water. The greenish sides of the fish offset a pink colored frame. While the fish is one of the harder fish to adapt to the tank water, it does make a good communal tank fish. Bronze Cory will not assault, mistreat, or interfere with the life of other fish.

Favorite dishes:
The Bronze enjoys Tubifex and white worms, yet he will eat dried dishes as well.

Water conditions
Alkalinity water is fine as long as the water condition is neutral. Hard water will suffice as long as you keep the volume in moderation. NaC1 or saltwater is not the Bronze Cory's preferred choice and these fish will let you know quick, therefore stay clear of this water condition.

    Sven Hylten-Cavallius - Article Source: GoArticles



2018-02-05

4 Popular CATFISH - Great Tips On Catfish Care

Corydoras paleatus
Corydoras paleatus (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Catfish are popular animals for keeping and eating. But, if you are looking for tips on great recipes, you're looking in the wrong place. This is where you are going to learn how to keep and maintain catfish as pets. One of the reasons people enjoy catfish is because they are very self-sufficient. Catfish clean up algae and other organisms from tanks making cleaning easier for the fish owner. Catfish get their name from the cat-like whiskers on their face.

There are so many different types of catfish and they range in sizes and shapes. There are the Mekong giant catfish that grows to six feet long. This is obviously a fish you aren't going to own. There are catfish that are easier to keep than others. The catfish in this article include the Black Spotted Corydoras, Peppered Corydoras, Leopard Corydoras and Loricariidae.

1. Black Spotted Corydoras: This catfish comes from Venezuela and Guiana and can grow to a little over two inches in length. The reason for the name is pretty obvious when you see it. It's silver with black spots. Black Spotted catfish make good pets. They aren't aggressive and are peaceful animals. They prefer to eat white worms or tubifex but will eat fish flakes.

2. Peppered Corydoras: The brown colored fish hails from Brazil. It also has spots on it but not as prominent as other catfish. Like other catfish, it handles communal tanks and cleans the tank well. It feeds on white worms, Tubifex, and flakes. The Peppered catfish enjoys the slightly acidic water, so check the pH level. It enjoys swimming in hard water.

3. Leopard Corydoras: The Leopard catfish is from the lower Amazon. The reason for the name is the dark spots over the silvery body that tends to form lines near the tail. The Leopard catfish is an easy fish to own. It's calm with other fish and doesn't act aggressively. It enjoys similar water conditions to the Peppered catfish and eats the same items. These fish usually swim around the bottom of the tank looking for food that the others have missed.

4. Loricariidae: These fish are covered in bony plates and are a hit with fish lovers. They have a suckermouth and clean up tanks as good as a vacuum. They love eating the algae and other tiny organisms, which makes cleaning the tank easier. These fish shouldn't be used as a substitute for cleaning. Cleaning must still be maintained. Most species of this catfish are nocturnal so you might not see them out during the day. They prefer slightly acidic water (6.0 - 7.5 pH) and a temperature between 72-82 degrees Fahrenheit. They are good in tanks with other fish but might fight with fish of their own species. These fish enjoy worms, insect larvae, and algae. They should be fed in the evening. Many of these fish are sold just for their algae eating purposes. Some of them can grow to be large fish, but many stay relatively small, sucking up the algae at night. There are some of these that are bred in captivity because they are such a popular fish.

Catfish are a great fish to have in your aquarium. Besides eating the algae and making your cleaning duties easier, they get along well with other fish. This is important because, with territorial fish, you can spend time trying to find the right combination of fish to put in your tank without them killing each other. Catfish come in many colors and varieties. Find the one you like best and enjoy the peaceful nature and low maintenance it brings to the tank.



2018-01-23

CATFISH in a 10 Gallon Aquarium

Untitled
Photo  by jorge.correa 
Catfish
When you are dealing with a smaller tank, the choice of a bottom fish depends, to a great extent, on the tank's present and planned inhabitants.  Not necessarily in fish alone, but in live plants as well. 
When there are no plants in the planned aquascape, there is little chance you may be bringing in pests such as snails, so that problem is not a factor for consideration. For my most recent aquarium set-up, the Fluval Edge, which holds only 6 U.S. gallons when filled right to the top, I added a juvenile Botia lohachata as the scavenger.

The tank is well planted and bringing snails into the ecosystem with the live plants, even well rinsed posed a distinct possibility.  As a matter of fact, I found an empty snail shell floating under the top glass very soon after I added the fish!

Although there is a wide selection of bottom fish available for the small community aquarium, I tend to use either Botia striatus or Botia lohachata nowadays. They do just fine in my high pH water and are not that common looking. The Botia striatus I have kept for the longest, and they have always been extremely shy. It may be the tank they are in, which is the largest of my small community aquariums. Or, the fact that they found a great hiding place right from the start and rarely exit it to scavenge for their meals.  They have always preferred to leave it only when they are hungry.

I have added the Botia lohachata in two different tanks. One is in the Fluval Edge mentioned above where there is a single individual.  The other a classic ten gallon planted system with two individuals as well as a pair of South Amercian Appistogramma aggasiz Dwarf Cichlids. This is a heavily planted aquarium. In each instance, the Botia lohachata are much more active than the B. striatus. In the ten gallon tank, the two there even feed on the top!

Whenever the pH is high, I also tend to include a Plecostomus.  But be careful of the water conditions when adding these fish, they do not do well in acid water. When kept in high pH, one will help control algae formation in almost any tank, no matter what its inhabitants may be. Right now one is doing quite well in my Tropiquarium 88 where it was placed after the biological filter matured. The tank has quite a number of African Cichlids and it is doing quite well in spite of these aggressive tank mates.  Plecostomus can grow over time, but still seem quite content to clean their areas well.  
Aggressivity is not a common trait with these fish, they are not particularly appetizing, so they are suitable for both passive and moderately aggressive communities.

If the tank is new, and everything was recently purchased, chances are you don't actually need to put in a catfish just yet. I prefer to let the tank begin to add some organic wastes as the tank matures for the first six to eight weeks. Only after the Nitrogen Cycle has been started and matured would I normally consider adding bottom fish of any kind. The tank doesn't need the added fish load, and the filter is so clean it should be able to handle the wastes while everything settles and gets into balance.  Since I do not feed bottom fish separately, I feel it is best to let the system get a little bit of waste in the bottom for a scavenger to find before they are considered as new arrivals.

For most common community aquariums, I use one of the various Corydoras sp. armored catfish as the bottom feeder of choice. There is a huge variety of choices in these dwarf catfish that will make one of them the perfect complement to a smaller aquarium community. You can pick between solids, stripes, blotches, albino and a lot of other possibilities.

These are scaleless catfish. If you should have a problem with Ich or other diseases and need to treat, read the directions on any medication very carefully. Remember that they are quite vulnerable to many of the medications typically used to kill many parasites. Generally, half doses are the maximum with these fish in a tank - but always follow the written directions to be safe.

One of the main problems new aquarists face is the presence of algae. I have kept fish for forty years or so, and I have grown quite used to seeing it in the tank and accept it as natural. Many people don't. They try to use a bottom fish to eliminate it. As mentioned, the various Plecostomus types are the very best of these. They are so ugly; they are interesting. Personally, I enjoy them immensely. The problem is that many aquascapes are maintained in an acid range, and this is deadly to alkaline loving Plecostomus. When placed in acid water they often turn white and die, so be careful and only use them when the pH is 7.2 or above.


One of the natural ways to remove algae is to ask a bottom fish, like the Plecostomus to eat it as part of his diet. This by no means a thorough way to eliminate the growths, but it can help keep the growths in check. Chinese Algae Eaters (Gyrinocheilus aymonieri), the Siamese Flying Fox (Crossochelius siamensis) and the more common Flying Fox (Epalseorhynchos kallopterus) are also used to help try to control the algae. I prefer either of the flying foxes which seem to prefer to eat algae most of the time.

The Siamese Flying fox is known to be a better algae eater - especially when this fish is kept in small schools. The Chinese Algae Eater will eat some algae when it is quite young but often turns aggressive towards other swimming inhabitants.  If possible they often try to suck the protective slime coating off other fish as a free meal.  As they age they prefer to be lazy rather than work on algae as a meal.




2017-12-18

Breeding the Bronze Catfish, CORYDORAS Aeneus

corydoras aeneus - bronze catfish side on
Photo  by h080 
Sexing
The female is a little bigger than the male, but the shape is a better way of telling the sexes apart. The female gets a bigger belly, and if looked at from above the female is clearly wider than the male.
The male has a longer and more pointed dorsal fin.

Breeding
The bronze Catfish is probably the easiest fish of its genus to breed. The parents to be should be well fed for a while before breeding. It is common to use two males and one female for breeding. In the wild, this species will breed at the start of the breeding season. A drop in water temperature will often stimulate the breeding. This drop can be as much as 4 degrees C. Some people go further and lower the temperature by sprinkling cooler water over the surface of the water to simulate heavy rain. This fish is an egg placer. The female carefully cleans a number of places for the eggs. These places may be on the sides of the aquarium, or on the leaves of plants.

When they are ready the breeders assume the "T" position with the female's mouth adjacent to the male's vent. The female takes the male's sperm into her mouth ready for fertilization. She lays her eggs into a little basket formed by her pectoral fins and carefully places the fertilized eggs onto the prepared places.

The number of eggs laid each time varies between 1 and 10. The breeders repeat this until the female has laid all her eggs. This may be up to 300 eggs and the spawning will sometimes take several days.
When they are first laid the eggs are nearly clear, but they darken to a golden brown. If they turn white they are infertile. Infertile eggs get fungus which can spread to healthy eggs. Generally, the eggs are separated from the parents because some people have observed Bronze Catfish eating their own eggs and young. The eggs hatch in about 5 days.

Fertilisation
The method of fertilization used by many corydoras catfish is in dispute. The old idea was that the sperm goes very quickly through the female's digestive tract and comes out of her vent in exactly the right position to fertilize the eggs. It has always been recognized that there were problems with this theory. The sperm would have to pass through much faster than food normally does, and avoid being digested. Various ways were postulated to explain how this is done.


Another idea is that the sperm comes out of the gill covers of the female and are directed backward in the right general direction to fertilize the eggs. Reading forums, you can see that there are people who adamantly insist that one or other of the theories are correct. The supporters of both sides are experienced breeders who have carefully observed the spawning of Bronze Catfish. Personally, I think the second theory is more likely to be correct.

Raising the Fry
After hatching the babies will live on their yolk sac for 2 or 3 days. They will then eat infusoria and fine fry food including Microworms and other very small live food.



2017-11-07

Suckermouth Catfish - Pleco - Hypostomus PLECOSTOMUS

Plecostomus




2017-10-21

TWIG CATFISH Farlowella acus

TWIG CATFISH  Farlowella acus



2017-09-04

Tips On Aquarium CATFISH Care - Adding Fun To Your Aquarium

Catfish are very popular in freshwater aquariums. They are very different and unique in their own way compared with other fish regarding their care and health. These catfish are so called because they have "barbells" which are a distinctive and prominent feature which resembles whiskers of a cat. Catfish also have no fish scales which are present in most other fishes. If the fish is in danger or irritated in any way, they can emit a stinging protein from a powerful, hollow ray which is found on their fins.

English: spotted raphael catfish
Spotted raphael catfish
(Photo credit: 
Wikipedia)

Most aquariums house the more popular catfish known as the armoured catfish which are the smaller sized catfish and look great in any aquarium. When setting up your tank, it is the best time to decide on whether you are going to purchase catfish, as you will need to buy the correct type of gravel or sand for your tank. You will also need to know the pH level of water required to house your catfish. A soft bottom material in your tank is the preferred option of the armoured catfish which like to forage for food within the substrate. Catfish like to hide from the light as they feel more secure so have some hiding places such as caves for your fish.

Caring for catfish is not much different to the care of other fish, although you should try to purchase food that settles to the bottom of the aquarium as they feed on the bottom. The water in the middle should be a temperature in the 70's and it should be neutral pH level. This set up is usually the same for the water balance of other fish that you will house as well, so it is not a major concern when choosing to house catfish.

Catfish are an amusing addition to your aquarium as they have funny and comical looks, but this also depends on the species that you buy. Their behaviour can vary, though they do look rather nice to have in your tank. Catfish can come in groups and schools which get on with each other quite well, but you can also buy loners which prefer not to have neighbours. When you have a communal tank full of different species of fish, the catfish is a good choice to have as they occupy the bottom of the tank, unlike many of the other occupants. They usually mix well with other types of fish, so you don't need to worry about them. You watch out for the larger Cichlids which are very territorial in trying to claim the whole tank.



Look at the other size of the other fish in your existing when choosing to add a catfish. Catfish, in general, get on with other fish, but they will also eat smaller fish. As they are nocturnal, catfish do not need to be feed until later on in the day or night. Adjust your schedule according to when you can feed your fish and to what types of fish you have in your aquarium. Armoured Catfish come in many different species so you can have an array of comical looking fish. The aquarium should be kept clean and healthy at all times so that all your fish stay healthy and you will get years of pleasure as you learn more about caring for them.




2017-07-27

WHIPTAIL CATFISH -Hemiloricaria parva

Whiptail Catfish -Hemiloricaria parva



2017-07-26

Tips on Caring For Your PLECOSTOMUS Algae Eater

Plecostomus or Hypostomus plecostomus belong to the family Loricariidae. Loricariidae means armored catfish named so because of the armor-like longitudinal rows of scutes that covers the upper parts of their bodies. They are endemic to both Central and South America. They are more commonly known as algae eaters or sucker mouth because of their suction cup like mouth.

Hypostomus Plecostomus
Hypostomus Plecostomus - Photo by Kasia/flickr 

Their dietary habits make the Plecostomus extremely popular among freshwater aquarists. In addition to the benefit of reducing algae growth, they are a solitary and peaceful creature making them a great addition to any community tank. They will actively seek out and eat algae at the microscopic level before it has a chance to develop into a cleaning and maintenance problem.

Before you buy one, you should be aware that these are not small fish. The ones you see in fish stores are young. In their natural habitat they can reach up to 24 inches. In captivity they will often grow to a foot long.

If you have a smaller tank you can still enjoy the benefits of an algae eater. The variety commonly marketed as the clown plecostomus only grow to 3-4 inches. The king tiger plecostomus will top out at about 6 inches. There is a rather unusual trait found among plecos species. Their foreheads enlarge as they mature. It is not uncommon for a plecostomus to live in excess of 10 years. Plecos are primarily herbivores. But they also eat the food scraps on the substrate missed by the other fish. These bottom dwellers will use their suction cup like mouths to attach themselves to the sides of aquariums where algae is beginning to develop.

Unlike many fish that have become a nuisance after aquarium trade related releases have introduced them to previously uninhabited ecosystems, the plecostomus has proved to be beneficial. They have been introduced to the freshwater ecosystems of Florida, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Vietnam, and Bangladesh.

Plecos are nocturnal creatures. It is a good idea to have hollow aquarium d├ęcor in your tank to give them a place to hide during the day should thy wish to do so. Plecos thrive in neutral water with a temperature range between 70-79°F.



Plecostomus Breeding
Plecos are not known to spawn in captivity. In the wild they dig pits in river beds to deposit their eggs into. Both parents guard the eggs until they hatch. Young fry feed off mucus on their parents' bodies until the have matured enough to fend for themselves.

Most of the fish that do not spawn in captivity are caught to support the thriving aquarium industry. This is very often not the case when it comes to the plecos. There are natives of South and Central America that have turned the harvesting of plecos eggs into an industry all its own. Eggs are collected from riverbeds are are then transported to fish farms where they are hatched and raised for eventual resale. Most of the commercially available plecos for sale fish stores in were harvested just this way.

    By Stephen J Broy
    Freshwater fish are the most popular aquarium fish worldwide because of their inexpensive price and ease of care. Many aquarium owners don't realize that there is a rather exotic alternative to freshwater fish in the realms of affordability and upkeep. Jellyfish aquariums are the hottest new trend in the aquarium industry. Jellyfish do require a special Jellyfish Aquarium Fish Tank in order to survive but they are far easier to keep alive and healthy than saltwater fish. If you find the idea of raising pet jellyfish intriguing, find out more about Moon Jellyfish and other Pet Jellies.
    Article Source: EzineArticles


2017-07-01

ZEBRA PLECO - Hypancistrus zebra

Zebra Pleco - Hypancistrus zebra



2017-06-30

Breeding CATFISH - The Bristlenose

Many aquarists tend to think of catfish simply as the "cleanup crew" and have them solely to keep the tank free of algae and to consume the bits of food that slip past the fish that feed higher in the tank. However this species is fascinating in its own right and breeding catfish is relatively easy in the home aquaria.

English: a Bristlenose Catfish (ancistrus doli...
A Bristlenose Catfish (ancistrus dolichopterus) (male) is sitting on a coconut shell
(Photo credit: 
Wikipedia)

The bristlenose catfish are popular because of their novel looks and their hard work! Within days of adding a bristlenose to a tank, every trace of algae will be gone. They are easy to breed in a community tank. The mature male has much longer bristles than the female and tends to be larger. They are not overly critical about water conditions but do prefer slightly acidic water, with a pH between 6.5 and 7 and a temperature between 75 and 80 degrees F.

As the bristelnose is a cave spawner you need to make sure that there are plenty of suitable hiding places in the tank. PVC pipe, flowerpots tipped on their sides, coconut shells and bogwood which the bristelnose likes not only for hiding under but for eating as well, are all good choices. They will also welcome thick plants around the perimeter of the tank Keep the water well oxygenated with good filtration, an airstone and pump.

To condition your bristelnose for breeding feed them with shrimp pellets, and some semi- boiled vegetables such as zucchini and cucumber. Quite often a large water change or slight increase in temperature can trigger spawning. Courting behavior varies, some pairs will spend days in preparation while others get straight "down to business". The male chooses a nest site in the PCV pipe or flowerpot and the female will then join him to lay a clutch of around fifty adhesive orange colored eggs. The male then fertilizes them and begins fanning them with his fins to aerate them.

The male is on duty guarding the eggs until they hatch in about three to five days. In another week they will become free swimming and will then need to be fed. Suitable foods are finely crushed vegetables like blanched lettuce, peas, zucchini as well as baby brine shrimp and minced bloodworms. Remember that bristelnose are bottom feeders and make sure that the foods make it to the bottom for them and are not snatched up by the other fish. Another source of food can be created by putting some rocks in jars of tankwater and leaving them on a sunny windowsill where they will grow a good coating of algae. Then place the rocks in the tank for the fry to feed on. Regular water changes together with a varied diet will ensure the healthy growth of the fry.




2017-06-02

Vegetable List For Feeding PLECOS

This is a list of a lot of Vegetables and some fruit that can be fed to your plecs. Also included are some suggestions for weighing the veg down in the tank.

IMPORTANT
1. Make sure you have an ID of your plec to ensure the correct dietary needs are met.
2. A varied diet of veg+fruit is needed so that nutritional needs are fulfilled.
3. Don't forget to include algae wafers, meat, and wood depending on species of plec.
4. If you put in anything that contains the skin or rind be sure to scrub it first to get rid of any pesticides.

English: A Baby Plecostomus
A Baby Plecostomus
(Photo credit: 
Wikipedia)

STARTER LIST
This is a list of vegetables and fruit that are popular with most plecs. Zucchini/Courgette Cucumber Peas (deshelled) Sweet Potato Green Beans Melon/Melon rind

OTHER VEGETABLES AND FRUIT
Apple (doesn't seem to be too popular) Asparagus Aubergine/Egg plant Avocado Broccoli/Stalk Butternut Squash+ other squash Capsicum/Bell pepper (not the hot ones) Cauliflower/Stalk Carrot Coconut Grapes Kale/Collard Greens Kiwi Fruit Lettuce Lima Beans Mango Mushroom (common plecs and goldspots love mushroom) let it float,they will reach it. Good exercise. Papaya Potato Pumpkin Spinach Sprouts Swede Tomato Yam

Most veg can be given raw but if you find no-one is interested then try blanching. Don't leave veggies and esp fruit in for too long otherwise you can end up with water quality problems. The easiest approach is to add them in the evening and remove in the morning.
SUGGESTIONS FOR WEIGHING DOWN VEG


Stainless Steel spoon (push the spoon through the veg) Stainless Steel fork (there have been suggestions that plecs have hurt themselves on the prongs of forks, use at your own risk) A rubber band/rock Suction capped Veggie clip (fish shops usually sell these) Screwcumber.




2017-05-09

ELECTRIC CATFISH - Malapterurus electricus

Electric Catfish - Malapterurus electricus




2017-04-13

Tips on Raising Healthy GLASS CATFISH

The glass catfish or Kryptopterus bicirrhis and its smaller relative the ghost catfish are native to Indonesia. They inhabit the large rivers and turbid waters of Borneo, Sumatra, the Malay Peninsula and the Chao Phrayaa and Mekongg drainage basins. They live near the shorelines in water with strong currents. They are diurnal predators (active in daylight) whose diet consists mainly of true water bugs in the wild.

Glass catfish
Photo by Matt Ryall 


Glass catfish are some of the most unusual fish you can buy for a freshwater aquarium. Their bodies are totally devoid of scales and their skin and meaty tissue is completely transparent. You can see right trough to its bones and internal organs and out the other side of their bodies.

As with all Catfish, they have barbells on either side of their mouths.

Glass catfish have a docile temperament. They make good community fish as long as they are in the company of similarly mild mannered fish. Glass catfish are a medium sized fish. They grow to about four inches in length. They are mid-tank swimmers.

The shoaling instinct runs extremely strong in these creatures. A glass catfish will not survive without another member of its own species in the tank. If you have two and one dies, the other will die shortly thereafter if you do not add another glass catfish to your tank. It is, therefore, advisable to keep at least four of them at a time.

Glass catfish are every bit as fragile as their name. They have been known not to survive the trip home from the fish store. Once home, their chances of survival are significantly increased in a heavily planted aquarium. They are a shy species and will fare much better given plenty of places to hide.

Glass catfish prefer neutral to slightly acidic water (pH 6.8-7.0). They are better suite for a water temperature a little cooler than some other tropical fish. The ideal temperature range is 70-79 degrees Fahrenheit. They function best in subdued lighting. And you want to have a filtering system that provides plenty of water flow to simulate the currents they are accustomed to living in. Under premium condition they have a life expectancy of 6 to 8 years.

Glass catfish are egg layers. Attempts to spawn them in captivity have thus far failed. So the ones you see at the fish store have been recently removed from their native environment. They may very well suffer from escalated stress levels until they adapt to their new surroundings.



Remember, these are not commercially raise fish. In the wild their diet consists primarily of true water bugs. They are carnivores that are accustomed to eating live food. In order to make help them adapt to their new environment you should start out by feeding them brine shrimp. Small insect larvae are preferable if you can find them. They will eventually learn to eat freeze-dried, frozen food and possibly even tropical fish flakes. But you still want to supplement their diet with live protein to insure their continued hardiness. These are, after all, rather delicate creatures.

    By Stephen J Broy
    The mere mention of the word "saltwater" sends shivers up many freshwater aquarium owners' spines. In the past decade a new segment of the aquarium industry has been created for home aquarium owners; the Jellyfish Aquarium Fish Tank. Jellyfish aquariums are much easier to maintain than traditional saltwater tanks. Pet Moon Jellyfish look absolutely incredible under a fading LED lighting system.
    Article Source: EzineArticles