Showing posts with label Freshwater aquarium. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Freshwater aquarium. Show all posts

2018-02-04

Fifty five Gallon Fresh Water Aquarium

Photo: Wikimedia
A fifty-five-gallon freshwater aquarium is a good choice when purchasing a new tank, if nothing else, simply because of its size.  These tanks are large enough to accommodative a variety of fish, but still small enough to keep in tight spaces in the home or office.  Your local retailer can assist you with specifics in purchasing, but here are some suggestions for the basics.  Purchase an acrylic tank, because they are lighter in weight and easier to care for than glass aquariums.  Also, the visibility is better in an acrylic tank.  If you don't already have a stand or a suitable replacement, keep in mind that you will need to purchase one.   

You will need a heater for temperature control, and a thermometer for checking the water temperature. It will take approximately five bags of rock or other substrates to line the bottom of the tank.  Choose a bright color to add some interest to the aquarium.  

In addition, you will need to purchase a filter for the tank.  Filters can be complicated.  Do a lot a research to find out what type of filter is suggested for the fish that you choose.  There are filters that go beneath the substrate in the bottom of the tank, as well as filters that attach to the side of the aquarium.  They also vary greatly in price.  It is not necessary to buy the most expensive filter when setting up a basic freshwater aquarium.  

The aquarium will also need lighting.  Again, based on personal preference you can keep it simple or get very technical.  Most fish will respond nicely to a basic light that is simply turned on for a few hours each day.  An aquarium should contain some form of plants for added interest.  The plants serve a place for the fish to seek refuge and feel safe.  There are many varieties of freshwater plants that would work nicely in a fifty-five-gallon aquarium.  Just be sure to purchase an aquatic specific species.  If you don't want the hassle of live plants, plastic is always an option.  They have come along way with synthetic plants.  In most cases, the fish may not even notice the difference, unless of course, they try to eat them.  

Once your tank is established and you are ready to add fish, choose your fish carefully. Start with hardy fish, such as livebearers, gouramis, barbs, and danios.  These fish are hardy enough to handle higher nitrate levels in the tank.  Allow about thirty days for these fish to become acclimated to the tank, before adding any new fish.  It usually takes about thirty days for the symptoms of ich or other fish illnesses to show up. It is important to make sure that all existing fish are healthy before adding any new species.  The transportation of new fish itself is stressful enough, without having to add disease to the situation.  When purchasing fish, it is important to remember that a fifty-five-gallon aquarium can handle about fifteen to twenty small fish total.  This will allow plenty of growth room for the fish.          



2017-09-28

FRESHWATER AQUARIUM History and You

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Photo Flickr -  n5_w1150 (cc)
The history of the freshwater aquarium and aquariums, in general, are varied depending on who you speak to. What is important today is how aquariums evolved and what they have evolved into. Also, the fact that aquariums do have a history, and it is rather interesting. From ancient Mesopotamia to modern-day Miami, aquariums have been apart of human life and have been written about by countless people who for one thing, liked their entertainment appeal as well as the reported soothing effects on the king and queen of ancient times.

The many ancient drawings, carvings, and pictures of aquariums from places in antiquity like Eqypt and Sumeria show us that these past peoples knew the beauty of the tanks and they also desired to maintain that beauty and pass on the secrets of these creatures. The ancient Romans were also known to have traded live fish as commodities in their agoras (markets).

Goldfish and Koi fish

In another part of the world, the art of selective breeding began in China around 2,000 years ago. They had been known to produce the now-famous goldfish developed from the regular carp. By the 18th century, goldfish as an ornamental fish was common in Europe and later became popular in America.

Cultured live koi – that familiar fish with the red, white and black coloration, was already a commercial item in the old trade routes that spanned China, Japan, and Europe around the 16th century. Later, its reputation also grew and became very popular. Much later, it was also exported to Europe and America.

Crude Beginnings
In the early 19th century, aquarium-keeping began. England, Germany, and France all vied to top themselves in mounting exhibits of public aquariums. It did not get a good reception as many were appalled by it.

At that time, there was very poor understanding yet on the various roles of water chemistry, the nitrogen cycle, filtration, and aeration. The size of the tanks was also limited by the holding power of the construction materials then.




The First Aquarium
In 1850, a Mr. Harrington declared through a paper he wrote for the Chemical Society of London that he had successfully maintained a stable aquarium. Fish-keeping suddenly became a popular hobby.

Three years after, many Zoo’s and farms began to open the first public aquariums one after another when they noticed a good turnout. Soon, public aquaria were all over the major European cities patronized by eager but intrigued visitors.

Household Items
It was not long after when the aquarium became a fashionable household item in Victorian England. Curiously, there were no tanks for sale then, although there were various books and other how-to manuals already available for constructing aquariums.

The first constructed tanks leaned more to the ornamental side rather than being functional at best. Most early designs featured a glass front and three wooden sides (They were sometimes constructed from slate). They were coated in pitch to make them watertight.

Tank Basics
Soon, these construction problems were overcome little by little. There was a real breakthrough with the development of silicone sealants.

It became possible now to manufacture an all-glass aquarium in all sizes and shapes. Bulky steel frames became obsolete and tanks can now be moved without the danger of breaking the seal.

Understanding Technology
At around this time, a better understanding of the needs of the tank’s fish inhabitants led to the invention of the heater and the thermostat, as postulated by a Mr. Humphreys. In maintaining fish, this person would be the one to mention the significance of the tanks chemistry toward the safety of the fish.

With a deeper understanding of water chemistry and other related matters, filtration and lighting were soon recognized as additional important elements to the total upkeep of the fish in the aquarium.

The Modern Aquarium
Today’s modern aquariums are made mostly of glass. Nowadays, more tanks are being made from acrylic instead of glass because it doesn’t break as easily. This is because acrylic is pliable and can be used to manufacture unusual shapes. (Acrylic aquariums are mostly used in big showrooms in business and office buildings today.)

Nowadays, aquaria made of acrylics are regarded as the lightweight alternatives to those made of glass. This is especially true now that manufacturers had produced harder and scratch-resistant plastics. Perhaps, they would replace the unwieldy glass in the future.

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Improved Technology

Also, there had been such long strides made in the improvement of the accompanying technology related to aquarium keeping: heating, lighting, filtration, and aeration among others.

Apart from the technology, there is now a better understanding of marine life and ecology that pushed the hobby into what it is today. Taking together both marine and freshwater aquarium varieties, the simple hobby of keeping a living fish in a bowl had become the world’s 2nd most popular hobby. (Gardening is number one.)

The Future Of The Aquarium

There is now a growing number of fish varieties available for keeping in aquariums and the size and shape of aquarium tanks have evolved, too.

However, according to experts, the future of the hobby is still focused on the next advances in water purification, nutrition, lighting and other related matters. Fish breeding is an old and popular practice that has become quite popular around the world with good breeds being created constantly. (Genetic manipulation is still frowned upon.)

Whatever direction the hobby is moving into, today’s hobbyists are reminded that they are part of a thousand-year-old freshwater aquarium history as they tinker their aquariums and feed their aquatic pets.


By Bob Finklea - Article Source: EzineArticles


2017-03-29

COLDWATER AQUARIUM Set-up and Care

As the hobby of having an aquarium becomes more and more popular, it should be noted that the easiest aquarium to care for and set up is a coldwater tank. As the name suggests, coldwater tanks require no heating set up. This cuts costs when setting up your first tank. It also makes the aquarium much easier to maintain in the long run. Keep in mind that only certain coldwater fish can survive in a tank without heat. Most common are goldfish and guppies, but there are a multitude available and you will be able to have an array of fish living in your coldwater tank.

English: Mid 19th Century glass freshwater aqu...
Mid 19th Century glass freshwater aquarium,
containing Vallisneria spiralis, goldfish, roach, and minnow.
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The supplies you will need to set up your aquarium may seem lengthy, but it is actually a much shorter and cheaper list than that of a heated freshwater tank or a saltwater tank. Obviously the first thing you need is a tank. It's all about personal choice here as they come in many sizes and shapes. When you purchase the tank, a kit often comes with it and includes some of the other things you may need. Just to make sure, check that you have a filter and  an air pump. These are the most important pieces to the whole set up. If you are buying your tank as a kit, make sure it is specified to be a coldwater set-up. You will notice that no heater will be included.

After the purchase of your tank, you can now consider how you wish to decorate it. Many types of gravel and sand are available in a lot of colors. You can add accent plants as well to make it appear more natural. Many people add little figures or signs to personalize their aquariums. It's all up to you in regards to d├ęcor. Be sure to buy a net, an algae scraper and conditioner for the water.

If you choose to have a tank with lighting, that is ok, just be aware of the problems it may cause. By adding light to the tank, you are also adding heat. Algae thrives on heat. Though a light won't harm your tank, it may add to algae growth. This is not uncommon and is easily cleaned. Your fish will enjoy having the light, so it is probably best to buy a hood that includes a light. Try to keep the tank out of direct sunlight when you choose it's position within your home. This will also add to algae growth.



Once you have your tank set up and the water is stabilized, you may add your fish. Be sure to only buy coldwater fish to add to this tank. If you are unsure of what types of fish are coldwater, ask for help at a pet store. They will offer you some extra tips on the types of fish you are purchasing as well. Once your fish are added, you will have a wonderful underwater scene to enjoy for years to come. It is important to clean and care for your tank on a routine basis. A complete cleaning of the tank should be done every 2 months, including a water change, scraping algae, rinsing the gravel of waste and changing filters.

You will find that as time passes, you will form a routing of caring for your coldwater aquarium. It is worth the effort to maintain the tank, as you will be rewarded with a wonderful addition to your home.

2017-03-28

LIVEBEARERS and Egg-layers - Learning the Different Fresh Water Aquarium Fish

Fresh water aquarium fish are classified into two groups: livebearers and egg-layers. Livebearers give birth to their young instead of laying eggs. Female Egg-layers discharges eggs when impregnated by the male fish.

All Fresh water aquarium fish are very colorful and attractive so how can you tell if one is a livebearer or an egg layer?

Swordtails (Livebearers)
The male has long tail like sword. Therefore, the fish is called the swordtail fish. Swordtail may grow upward to 5 inches. Generally, they are peaceful but the male is known for chasing after other male. To protect the young ones the female must be tooking out because the females are well known for eating up their young.

Poecilia wingei, Endler's Livebearer
 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Guppies (Livebearers)
The male guppies are fancy and colorful, whereas the females are dull and plain. This fish breeds well however overcrowding can become a problem in the aquarium.

Mollies (Livebearers)
Prefers a little salt in their water. They comes in many distinct colors such as orange, green and black. One of the Molly's biggest problem is stopping them from breeding. The females are generally larger and broader. When pregnant, the females have a dark gravid spot near her anal fin. Mollies will eat up their young, so it's crucial to either have a big plant or a separate breeding tank.

Pearl Gourami (Egg-Layers)
Pearl Gourami are typically quite easy to feed. They like eating live foods such as black worms, brine shrimp, and glass worms. Supply plenty of floating plants and bring the water temperature to close to 80 degrees. The males build a bubble nest, after which breeding will happen. When spawning the male wraps his body around the female who then releases hundreds of eggs. After the eggs have been laid remove the female. Four days later the small fry will be free swimming and the male should be removed.

Freshwater angelfish
Freshwater angelfish (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Angelfish (Egg-Layers)
Besides their graceful beauty, Angelfish are one of the most popular selections of tropical fish due to their lustiness and simplicity of keeping. Angels cannot merely be placed collectively together as a pair in a tank and be expected to breed. Angelfish prefer to choose their own mates and pair up.
Angelfish mating or spawning starts with the pair selecting a flat surface in the tank to lay the eggs.





    By Latree Brown
    Latree has always had a passion for fresh water aquarium fish ever since childhood. She runs an informational website alone with many blogs that answers all your questions, from setting up your tank and selecting fish to the water, chemicals, plants, and much more. For more make sure you check out [http://www.tropicalfish1.info]

    Article Source: EzineArticles


2017-02-12

Switching From a FRESHWATER to a Home SALTWATER AQUARIUM

Many people would like to own and maintain a saltwater aquarium but they shy away from them, turning instead to the freshwater variety because they have been told that saltwater aquariums are difficult to maintain and require additional equipment. That is not necessarily true. For the most part converting a freshwater tank to a saltwater tank is simple. Most of the equipment both tanks use is the same, with only a few notable exceptions. One such exception is the aquarium substrate. 

A shot of our 10 Gallon tank. Hopefully being ...
A shot of our 10 Gallon tank. Hopefully being used as an example of a personal water tank.
(Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Instead of using the gravel that your fresh water fish preferred tropical fish fare better with a substrate that is made of live sand or crushed coral. Most filtering systems work well in both freshwater and saltwater environments, but many aquarium owners take advantage of the opportunity to upgrade their system, i is also important to remember that the filter you are using in your saltwater tank circulates the water throughout the entire tank. Disturbing the water's surface maximizes the amount of oxygen in the water. If you are planning to maintain a fish only aquarium you shouldn't have to worry about upgrading your lighting system. The only time the lights will have to be upgraded is if you start adding coral reefs to your tank.

A mistake many aquarium lovers make when they are converting their freshwater tanks to saltwater tanks is assuming that all they have to do is add a little salt to the water and voila, a saltwater tank. All they have done is create an environment that will kill any coral reefs, tropical fish, and freshwater fish that they place in the tank. The bacteria in saltwater is completely different from the bacteria in freshwater. People who want to speed the waters cycling process should scoop some aquarium substrate from a warm saltwater aquarium and transfer it to a temperate saltwater aquarium. Before you add fish to your freshly converted tank, make sure you purchase a refractometer and hydrometer to test the salinity of your water. The salinity should have a specific gravity that is between 1.020 and 1.026.

Saltwater causes rust. Check your tank and filtration system regularly. If you notice rust starting to form, it's time to replace your equipment.

Before you start stocking you saltwater aquarium with fish do a little research. Many variety's of tropical fish require a different type of food the freshwater varieties. Several of these variety's have to be fed combinations of fresh, frozen, and live food in addition to fish flakes. Frozen food should not be kept in your freezer for more then three months. If you are purchasing a fish that is going to need a great deal of live food, find out what kind of arrangements are going to Switching From a Freshwater Aquarium to a Home Saltwater Aquariums



Many people would like to own and maintain a saltwater aquarium but they shy away from them, turning instead to the freshwater variety because they have been told that saltwater aquariums are difficult to maintain and require additional equipment. That is not necessarily true. For the most part converting a freshwater tank to a saltwater tank is simple. Most of the equipment both tanks use is the same, with only a few notable exceptions. One such exception is the aquarium substrate. Instead of using the gravel that your fresh water fish preferred tropical fish fare better with a substrate that is made of live sand or crushed coral. Most filtering systems work well in both freshwater and saltwater environments, but many aquarium owners take advantage of the opportunity to upgrade their system, i is also important to remember that the filter you are using in your saltwater tank circulates the water throughout the entire tank. Disturbing the water's surface maximizes the amount of oxygen in the water. If you are planning to maintain a fish only aquarium you shouldn't have to worry about upgrading your lighting system. The only time the lights will have to be upgraded is if you start adding coral reefs to your tank.

A mistake many aquarium lovers make when they are converting their freshwater tanks to saltwater tanks is assuming that all they have to do is add a little salt to the water and voila, a saltwater tank. All they have done is create an environment that will kill any coral reefs, tropical fish, and freshwater fish that they place in the tank. The bacteria in saltwater is completely different from the bacteria in freshwater. People who want to speed the waters cycling process should scoop some aquarium substrate from a warm saltwater aquarium and transfer it to a temperate saltwater aquarium. Before you add fish to your freshly converted tank, make sure you purchase a refractometer and hydrometer to test the salinity of your water. The salinity should have a specific gravity that is between 1.020 and 1.026.

Saltwater causes rust. Check your tank and filtration system regularly. If you notice rust starting to form, it's time to replace your equipment.

Before you start stocking you saltwater aquarium with fish do a little research. Many variety's of tropical fish require a different type of food the freshwater varieties. Several of these variety's have to be fed combinations of fresh, frozen, and live food in addition to fish flakes. Frozen food should not be kept in your freezer for more then three months. If you are purchasing a fish that is going to need a great deal of live food, find out what kind of arrangements are going to have to be made to keep the food alive before consumption.

Most fish owners recommend purchasing a small tank that can be used as a quarantine tank. Placing a sick fish in a quarantine tank will make treating it easier and increase its odds of survival.have to be made to keep the food alive before consumption.

Most fish owners recommend purchasing a small tank that can be used as a quarantine tank. Placing a sick fish in a quarantine tank will make treating it easier and increase its odds of survival.